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Cascading effects of predator activity on tick-borne disease risk

Predators and competitors of vertebrates can in theory reduce the density of infected nymphs (DIN)—an often-used measure of tick-borne disease risk by lowering the density of reservoir-competent hosts and/or the tick burden on reservoir-competent hosts. We investigated this possible indirect … read more

Wolves contribute to disease control in a multi-host system

We combine model results with feld data for a system of wolves (Canis lupus) that prey on wild boar (Sus scrofa), a wildlife reservoir of tuberculosis, to examine how predation may contribute to disease control in multi-host systems. Results show … read more

Restoration of the Iconic Pando Aspen Clone: Emerging Evidence of Recovery

Pando, the world’s largest living organism — and possibly its oldest — is being destroyed by the voracious appetite of mule deer.  According to the authors, “Humans have eliminated predators,” Without wolves prowling the area, deer populations not only explode, but … read more

The Role Of Predation In Disease Control: A Comparison Of Selective And Nonselective Removal On Prion Disease Dynamics In Deer

Effective measures for controlling chronic wasting disease (CWD), a contagious prion disease of cervids, remain elusive. We review theoretic relationships between predation and hostparasite dynamics and describe a mathematical model to evaluate the potential influence of random removal through harvest … read more

Saving large carnivores, but losing the apex predator?

Large terrestrial carnivores, e.g. wolves or bears, often play a key ecological role from their position at the apex of trophic systems. Changes to their populations reverberate through ecological communities; consequently their widespread decline in numbers and shrinking distribution due … read more

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