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Wolves, deer, and deer hunting in northeastern Minnesota: the data

There is much debate regarding the role wolves have on deer populations and deer hunting in particular. Many have stated that wolves are “decimating” the deer population in Minnesota and that we need to kill wolves to resolve this issue. … read more

Eat or be eaten: Implications of potential exploitative competition between wolves and humans across predator-savvy and predator-naive deer populations

Recolonization of predators to their former ranges is becoming increasingly prevalent. Such recolonization places predators among their prey once again; the latter having lived without predation (from such predators) for a considerable time. This renewed coexistence creates opportunities to explore … read more

Logging, linear features, and human infrastructure shape the spatial dynamics of wolf predation on an ungulate neonate

Humans are increasingly recognized as important players in predator–prey dynamics by modifying landscapes. This trend has been well-documented for large mammal communities in North American boreal forests: logging creates early seral forests that benefit ungulates such as white-tailed deer (Odocoileus … read more

Wolves alter the trajectory of forests by shaping the central place foraging behaviour of an ecosystem engineer

Predators can directly and indirectly alter the foraging behaviour of prey through direct predation and the risk of predation, and in doing so, initiate indirect effects that influence myriad species and ecological processes. We describe how wolves indirectly alter the … read more

Factors Limiting Deer Abundance in the Upper Peninsula

In the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, there are numerous factors that may act singularly or in combination to influence deer abundance. For instance, if food availability was greatly reduced, especially during critical times, or habitat that is essential for survival … read more

Recovery of a marine keystone predator transforms terrestrial predator–prey dynamics

Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) and wolves (Canis lupus) are two apex predators with strong and cascading effects on ecosystem structure and function. After decades of recovery from near extirpation, their ranges now overlap, allowing sea otters and wolves to interact … read more

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