Hunting Wolves

Differentiating between regulation and hunting as conservation interventions

Hunting never saves the targeted species. Overlooking the role of regulation in hunting programs weakens inference about successful conservation interventions and misguides policy.

Treves et al / Reprinted with permission

Hallmarks of science missing from North American wildlife management

Study unveils new findings that challenge the widespread assumption that wildlife management in North America is science-based.

Artelle et al

Impacts of Breeder Loss

Borg et al

A case study of wolf (Canis lupus) hunting in Michigan, United States

Vucetich et al

Implications of Harvest on the Boundaries of Protected Areas for Large Carnivore Viewing Opportunities

Borg et al

Gray Wolf Harvest in Idaho

Ausband et al

Heavily hunted wolves have higher stress and reproductive steroids than wolves with lower hunting pressure

Bryan et al 2014

Effects of Hunting on Cougar Complaints and Livestock Depredation

The hunting of cougar caused depredations to increase
Peebles et al

Effects of Wolf Mortality on Livestock Depredations

Washington State University researchers have found that it is counter-productive to kill wolves to keep them from preying on livestock. Shooting and trapping lead to more dead sheep and cattle the following year, not fewer.
Wielgus et al

Meta-Analysis of Relationships between Human Offtake, Total Mortality and Population Dynamics of Gray Wolves

Hunting affects wolves more strongly than expected
Creel et al

Hunters as Stewards of Wolves?

Hunters of wolves showed little inclination to conserve wolves
Treves et al

Protection from harvesting restores the natural social structure of eastern wolf packs

November 25, 2009

Wolf Paw Print