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Wolves choose ambushing locations to counter and capitalize on the sensory abilities of their prey

Comprehensive knowledge of ambush behavior requires an understanding of where a predator expects prey to be, which is generally unknowable because ambush predators often hunt mobile prey that exhibit complex, irregular, or inconspicuous movements. Wolves (Canis lupus) are primarily cursorial … read more

Human disturbance causes widespread disruption of animal movement

Disturbance and habitat modification by humans can alter animal movement, leading to negative impacts on fitness, survival and population viability. However, the ubiquity and nature of these impacts across diverse taxa has not been quantified. We compiled 208 studies on … read more

Large carnivore hunting and the social license to hunt

The social license to operate framework considers how society grants or withholds informal permission for resource extractors to exploit publicly owned resources. We developed a modified model, which we refer to as the social license to hunt (SLH). In it … read more

Wolves Demonstrate Self-Awareness in Sniff Test

Grey wolves pass an olfactory version of the mirror test for self-recognition. Since the 1970s, scientists have employed the mirror test as an assay of self-awareness. If an animal or child recognizes themselves in a mirror — for instance, touching … read more

Immigration does not offset harvest mortality in groups of a cooperatively breeding carnivore

The effects of harvest on cooperatively breeding species are often more complex than simply subtracting the number of animals that died from the group count. Changes in demographic rates, particularly dispersal, could offset some effects of harvest mortality in groups … read more

Sarcoptic mange severity is associated with reduced genomic variation and evidence of selection in Yellowstone National Park wolves (Canis lupus)

Population genetic theory posits that molecular variation buffers against disease risk. Although this “monoculture effect” is well supported in agricultural settings, its applicability to wildlife populations remains in question. In the present study, we examined the genomics underlying individual-level disease … read more

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